In the typical hospital, everything needs to work, particularly the electrical elements. A hospital spends more than 50% of its energy budget on electricity. Lighting, medical apparatus and computer systems all rely on it, as do patients and staff. All electrical items should always work, as even the tiniest outage can pose a safety risk.

Measuring performance and safety may, on the surface, seem like hard work, but frequent testing of all things electrical is essential. From the power supply to the wiring, sockets and individual appliances, testing everything can help to spot flaws right away and save lives. A multimeter can do that without needing to use lots of different devices.

One Tool, Many Functions

A multimeter, also known as a multitester or VOM (volt-ohm-milliammeter), is a handheld gadget that many electricians use. It can measure the voltage, resistance and current in appliances and circuits for anything that runs on electricity. The typical multimeter can take all those measurements and turn them into a single figure.

They work by being plugged into a circuit, where it then gathers the necessary data. To connect a multimeter to a circuit, they should come with a few different output leads. They come in two forms; analog, which uses a needle to measure fluctuations and digital, which gives a single number at the end of a reading. Large and small appliances can be tested.

Without tools like Rigol multimeters, the ability to measure whether power is flowing correctly through key appliances will be greatly reduced. To the nearest volt, users can spot if the level is what it should be. If not, it means that the circuit needs to be fixed or that the circuit they are testing is in some way faulty.

Safety Standards

In healthcare settings, testing is hugely important. For apparatus such as MRI scanners and X-ray generators, they need to be checked regularly. To do that, turn the relevant appliance on then plug in the testing equipment. After that, you should get a reading and if something is not right, the level of voltage or current coming through the affected apparatus needs changing.

Testing medical technology is useful for staff and patients alike. Even the tiniest flaw in one small circuit like a frayed wire could put lives at risk. Staff need to be able to do their jobs, whilst patients should be cared for without being operated on with faulty equipment.